The First Congress of the U.S. Basic Income Guarantee Network
Fundamental Insecurity or Basic Income Guarantee?

March 8-9, 2002, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue between 34th and 35th streets.

Program

DAY 1, FRIDAY MARCH 8

Coffee and Registration, 8:00 – 9:00
Greeting, 9:00 – 9:15

Michael Lewis, SUNY School of Social Welfare at Stony Brook

Frances Brisbane, Dean, SUNY School of Social Welfare at Stony Brook

Karl Widerquist, the Educational Priorities Panel

Opening Speaker, 9:15 – 10:00

Guy Standing, Director of the Socio-Economic Security Programme of the International Labour Organisation

Plenary Session (1): Fundamental Insecurity or Basic Income Guarantee? 10 – 11:30

Stanley Aronowtiz, City University of New York, coauthor The Jobless Future

Frank Kirkland, Hunter College

Lynn Chancer, Fordham University, author of Sadomasochism in Everyday Life

Chair: Fred Block

Break, 11:30 – 11:45
Session 1 (view abstracts) (view full texts), 11:45 – 1:30
1A: HISTORY OF BIG, PART I

Fred Block, “Basic Income and the Shadow of Speedhamland”

John Cunliffe and Guido Erreygers, “Inheritance and Equal Shares: Early American Views”

Walter Van Trier, “Who Framed ‘Social Dividend’?”

Chair: Brian Steensland

1B: THE ETHICS OF BIG, PART I

Karl Widerquist, “Who Exploits Who?”

Almaz Zelleke, "Basic Income in the United States: Redefining Citizenship in the Liberal State"

Al Sheahen, “Does Everyone Have a Right to a Basic Income Guarantee?”

Chair: Michael Howard

1C: BIG FUNDING OPTIONS

Jeffery J Smith, “BI- Brought to you by the people in the environmental movement”

Stephen C. Clark, “Funding a Basic Income Guarantee Considering Size, Political Viability, and Pipeline.”

Myron Frankman, “Funding a Planet-Wide Citizen's Income: Trial Calculations”

Chair: Charles M.A. Clark

Lunch Break, 1:30 – 2:30
Session 2 (view abstracts) (view full texts), 2:30 – 4:15
2A: HISTORY OF BIG, PART II

Richard K. Caputo, “FAP Flops: Lessons Learned from the Failure to Pass the Family Assistance Plan in 1970 and 1972?”

Al Sheahan, “Why not Guarantee Everyone a Job? Why the Negative Income Tax Experiments of the 1970s were Successful”

Karl Widerquist, “A Preliminary Review of the Literature on the Negative Income Tax Experiments.”

Chair: John Cunliffe

2B: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF BIG, PART I

Nicoli Nattrass and Jeremy Seekings “The Political-Economy of a Basic Income Grant in South Africa”

Charles M. A. Clark, “Basic Income: Promoting Social Justice in a 21st Century Economy”

Steven Shafarman, “Beyond Left vs. Right: A New Political Discourse”

Chair: James Bryan

2C: EMPIRICAL ISSUES OF POVERTY, INEQUALITY, AND EFFICIENCY

Irwin Garfinkel, Chien-Chung Huang, Wendy Naidich“Effects Of Tax Rebates on Poverty and Income Distribution”

Ed Wolff, “Recent Trends in Living Standards in the United States”

Steven Pressman, “Guaranteed Incomes and the Equity-Efficiency Tradeoff”

Chair: Jeff Manza

Break, 4:15 – 4:30
Plenary Session (2): Looking Back at the Guaranteed Income Experiments, 4:30 – 6:15

Robinson Hollister, professor of economics, Swarthmore College, and coauthor of Labor Market Policy and Unemployment Insurance

Robert Levine, Rand

Alice O’Connor, UC Santa Barbara, author of Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy and the Poor in Twentieth Century U.S. History

Harold Watts, emeritus professor of economics and public affairs, Columbia University, coeditor of The New Jersey Income Maintenance Experiment, Volumes II and III

Walter Williams, emeritus professor of public affairs, University of Washington, author of Honest Numbers and Democracy: Social Policy Analysis in the White House, Congress, and the Federal Agencies

Chair: Robert Harris, former Executive Director of the President's Commission on Income Maintenance, former Vice President of the Urban Institute

Reception, 6:30 – 8:00
Film, 8:00 – 9:00

“A Day’s Work, a Day’s Pay”

Followed by a question and answer session featuring filmmakers Jonathan Skurnik and Kathy Leichter and union organizer Jaun Manuel Galan.

DAY 2, SATURDAY MARCH 9

Coffee and Registration, 8:00 – 9:00
Session 3 (view abstracts) (view full texts), 9:00 – 10:45
3A: HISTORY OF BIG, PART III

Brian Steensland, “Defining Welfare: Media Depictions of the Struggle over Guaranteed Income, 1966-1980.”

Robert Harris, “The Guaranteed Income Movement of the 1960s and 1970s”

Buford Farris, “Was it only a Dream: Guaranteed Income through the eyes of a Sixties Poverty Warrior in Texas”

Chair: Sally Lerner

3B: THE ETHICS OF BIG, PART II

Amy Wax, “Something for Nothing: The Liberal Case Against Welfare Work Requirements.”

Roy Morrison, “A Framework for Justice and Fairness”

Michael W. Howard, “Liberal and Marxist Justifications for Basic Income”

Chair: Almaz Zelleke

3C: BIG AND THE ALTERNATIVES, PART I

James B. Bryan, “Did the U.S. Welfare Reforms of 1996 and the Expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit Eliminate the Need for a Basic Income Guarantee?”

Steven Shafarman, “Ending Hunger, Homelessness, and Debilitating Poverty: Comparing BIG and other approaches”

Stephen Bouquin & Catherine Levy, “Social minima a part of recommodification of labour? Critical assessment concerning the tendencies towards basic income”

Chair: Walter Van Trier

Break, 10:45 – 11:00
Plenary Session (3): BIG Through the Lens of Gender, 11:00 – 12:00

Mimi Abramowitz, Hunter College School of Social Work, author of Regulating the Lives of Women

Ruth Brandwein, the SUNY School of Social Welfare, Stony Brook, author of Battered Women, Children and Welfare Reform: The Ties That Bind

Barbara Bergmann, American University, author of The Economic Emergence of Women, author of In Defense of Affirmative Action, coauthor of America's Child Care Problem: The Way Out

Chair: Michael Lewis

Keynote address, 12:00 – 1:00: “From a Minimum Income to a Basic Income in Brazil.” (view full text)

Brazilian Senator Eduardo Suplicy, author of Citizen's Income-The Exit is through the Door

Lunch Break / Organizational Meeting for USBIG, 1:00 – 2:15
Session 4 (view abstracts) (view full texts), 2:15 – 4:00
4A: ACTIVISTS ROUND TABLE

Steven Shafarman, The Citizen Policies Institute

Greg Scharma-Holt, Vice President of 1199 local hospital workers union

Terri Scofield, founder of Suffolk Welfare Warriors

Chair: Susanna Jones, Hunter College School of Social Work

4B: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF BIG, PART II

Walter Van Trier, “Do Firms Need to be Third Places for Jobs to be (Public) Good(s)? Remarks on André Gorz’s recantation of the second cheque strategy and his adoption of basic income”

Michael Lewis “Perhaps There Can be Too Much Freedom”

Thierry Laurent and Yannick L’Horty “Static vs. Dynamic Inactivity Trap on the Labor Market: Revisiting the “Making Work Pay” Issue.”

Chair: Buford Farris

4C: BIG AND THE ALTERNATIVES, PART II

Jerold Waltman, “The Basic Income Guarantee and the Living Wage: A Comparative Anatomy”

Barbara R. Bergmann. “A Swedish-Style Welfare State Or Basic Income: Which Should Have Priority?”

Karl Widerquist, “Phelp’s Economic Discipline as Undisciplined Economics”

Chair: Fred Block

Break, 4:00 – 4:15
Plenary Session (4): What Is the Next Step? 4:15 – 5:30

Anne Alstott, Yale University, coauthor of The Stakeholder Society

Joel Blau, the SUNY School of Social Welfare, Stony Brook, author of Illusions of Prosperity

Sumner Rosen, Columbia University and Vice-Chair of the National Jobs For All Coalition 

Jeff Manza, Northwestern University 

Chair: Eri Noguchi, Columbia University